Wives of jailed police say torture used

Wang Lijun

The wives of three jailed policemen in Chongqing, swept up during the mega-city’s controversial clamp down on crime and corruption, say they are seeking to have the cases reopened because their husbands were falsely accused and tortured during their interrogation.

The women, speaking to the South China Morning Post on condition of anonymity, said they are preparing to appeal against the verdicts in their husbands’ cases.

They also pointed fingers at Wang Lijun, the municipality’s former police chief whose defection attempt at the US consulate in nearby Chengdu in February triggered the country’s worst political crisis in two decades. They alleged that Wang framed their husbands and fabricated the cases for his own political gain.

The crackdown was launched in 2009 by the southwestern municipality’s disgraced former party boss, Bo Xilai, and spearheaded by Wang, his close ally before a nasty fallout that culminated in Bo’s downfall. The crime sweep led to the arrest of nearly 6,000 people, including businessmen, government advisers, crime bosses and senior law enforcement officers such as Wen Qiang, Chongqing’s former top judicial official, who was later executed for corruption.

According to the wives, the three policemen were tortured for several days and nights, and threats about their families were made during the interrogation.

Interrogators told Feng Ping, a 50-year-old former political commissar of the Hechuan district Public Security Bureau: “If you don’t write this [the confession], we’re going to take your wife and child and your whole family and put them in prison,” according to his wife.

She said he was strapped to an iron bench for several days and nights, during which “they didn’t let him sleep or go to the toilet”.

Feng was sentenced to 17 years in prison in May after being convicted on charges of taking bribes from a jailed businessman and providing protection for him.

The other two policemen, Huang Chongjun and Yang Changbin, were respectively sentenced to 13 and 12 years in prison on the same charges. Huang’s wife said he was tortured for five days, while Yang’s wife said he was tortured for 22 days.

Feng was convicted of taking 400,000 yuan (HK$490,000) in bribes, and of giving 200,000 yuan to Huang, the former captain of the criminal police detachment in Hechuan district. Huang was convicted of then giving 100,000 yuan to Yang, his subordinate.

The businessman involved in the case was Wang Tianlun, a co-owner of a big food company in Chongqing. Wang was sentenced to death for his alleged mafia activities, but the sentence was later suspended. His company was fined 100 million yuan.

Feng, Huang and Yang appeared in court in January 2011. They all pleaded not guilty and retracted their earlier confessions.

Feng’s wife said, “Even before they went to court, I heard from our police contacts what the sentences would be, and they turned out exactly the same.”

She added: “I told everyone that Wang Lijun fled to the US consulate before it was reported. I knew it from my contacts. But nobody dared to believe happiness had come so suddenly. Did you hear fireworks the last time you were in Chongqing? People started lighting fireworks after Wang Lijun’s fall. There must be so many cases of injustice.”

Lavinia Mo
South China Morning Post



Categories: Politics & Law

Tags: , , , , , , ,

4 replies

  1. Reblogged this on Craig Hill.

    Like

  2. Some shit going on .. in China, this Bo … pops up everywhers

    Like

Trackbacks

  1. Chongqing torturers now the hunted, ex-lawyer says « China Daily Mail
  2. Ex-official in China admits he sold top jobs « China Daily Mail

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