May 25 1977 Chinese government removes ban on Shakespeare

Craig Hill

 

On May 25th 1977, a new sign of political liberalisation appeared in China, when the communist government lifted its decade-old ban on the writings of William Shakespeare. The action by the Chinese government was additional evidence that the Cultural Revolution was over.

In 1966, Mao Tse-Tung, the leader of the People’s Republic of China, announced a “Cultural Revolution,” which was designed to restore communist revolutionary fervour and vigour to Chinese society. His wife, Chiang Ching, was made the unofficial secretary of culture for China. What the revolution meant in practice, however, was the assassination of officials deemed to have lost their dedication to the communist cause and the arrest and detention of thousands of other officials and citizens for vaguely defined “crimes against the state.”

It also meant the banning of any cultural work–music, literature, film, or theatre–that did not have the required ideological content.

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Categories: History

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  1. On 25 May in Asian history | The New ASIA OBSERVER
  2. On 25 May in Chinese history, Hong Kong and Taiwan | The New ASIA OBSERVER

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