Over 1,000 Chinese fishing boats to fish in disputed waters near Senkakus


Chinese Fishing Boats

Ming Pao reports from Beijing, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Hong Kong: While mass anti-Japan protests spread to at lease 85 cities in China, over 1,000 fishing boats set out for the sea areas around the Diaoyu Islands to fish and claim sovereignty yesterday when the annual fishing ban ended in the East China Sea.

Due to Typhoon Sanba, there will be some delay, but they are expected to arrive at the area this afternoon.

Fishermen at the Lianjiang Island, Fujian Province have fished in the area around the Diaoyu Islands for generations. They complained that over past 10 years they have often been driven away by Japan.

Due to reduction of fish in coastal areas, fishermen elsewhere have also to go further to the area near the disputed islands to fish, but they too have been frequently driven away by Japanese coastal guards.

However, out of patriotism, they are all anxious to go there again to fish and claim sovereignty.

According to www.cnr.cn, Lin Zengfu, a major fishing operator in Wenzhou, is contacting other major operators for a joint fishing operation in the Diaoyu area.

He said that as their boats were bigger and nets, more advanced, they had to go further to catch fish. They would certainly go to the Diaoyu Islands as the islands are Chinese territory.

China’s Ministry of Agriculture said it had already asked the fishing administration ships in various provinces to protect the fishing boats on their way.

How will Japan respond? Will there be any conflicts that may lead to war?

PLA navy is holding a large-scale live ammunition drill in the East China Sea, regarded as an action to hold Japan in awe. That does not bode well.

Click here for all stories about Senkaku Islands (Diaoyu Islands)



Categories: Politics & Law

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2 replies

Trackbacks

  1. Is China secretly hoarding the world’s fish? | China Daily Mail
  2. Illegal fisherman from China shot dead while threatening South Korean Coast Guard | China Daily Mail

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