How will China react to 20,000 US troops training in Australia?

Marines assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) deployed to the amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) prepare to patrol in light armored vehicles during an exercise at Freshwater Bay supporting Talisman Saber 2009. Talisman Saber is a joint exercise between the U.S. and the Australian Defense Force that includes participation from more than 20,000 U.S. and 10,000 Australian personnel.

Marines assigned to the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) deployed to the amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2) prepare to patrol in light armored vehicles during an exercise at Freshwater Bay supporting Talisman Saber 2009. Talisman Saber is a joint exercise between the U.S. and the Australian Defense Force that includes participation from more than 20,000 U.S. and 10,000 Australian personnel.

This article, by Matthew M. Burke, appeared on the ‘Stars and Stripes’ website.

It raises a few questions about the agenda and implications.

I would hope the Australian people would look at this manoeuvre with more than a cursory assessment. Where is our democracy? What will China think about this? Are Australians puppets in the hands of the US? Why should Australia risk China not respecting our sovereignty and friendship?

A joint U.S. and Australian military and humanitarian exercise — kicked off this week as approximately 20,000 U.S. troops descended on Australia’s east coast.

The focus of this year’s exercise has shifted to amphibious operations as the training moved from the Northern Territory to Australia’s east coast and the Coral Sea. It also marks the first time the MV-22 Osprey hybrid aircraft will touch down on Australian soil. Federal agencies such as the FBI will also have an expanded role as they train with their Australian counterparts.

The fifth iteration of the bi-annual, bi-lateral, exercise is also the biggest to date.

“This year, the U.S. has come in strength,” exercise spokesman Australian Brigadier Bob Brown said Wednesday.

Brown said that the increased presence was most likely due to the U.S. pivot to the Pacific. Also, the USS Bonhomme Richard’s predecessor, the USS Essex, was unable to take part in the exercise two years ago due to maintenance issues.

“The U.S. was a bit more stretched at that time,” Brown said.

“For Australia, [the exercise] is important because we’re developing an increased amphibious capability,” he said.

The Australians plan to procure two amphibious assault ships in the next couple of years, Brown said, so there is an increased emphasis placed on training with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group.

The exercise will feature comprehensive amphibious, airborne and special operations training. The U.S. has sent 15 ships this year, including the George Washington Carrier Strike Group, which will be coupled with 11 Australian vessels. The exercise is being observed by representatives from Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia, Canada and the U.K.

Read the complete article here

 



Categories: Defence & Aerospace

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

4 replies

  1. As an American, I wish our government would think enough about their desires to consider how us American’s think about paying for 20,000 troops, all of their equipment and costly logistics to train in Australia. I know I’m not very happy about it. And wouldn’t Australia be better off with 20,000 tourists than troops?

    Like

Trackbacks

  1. Australian Foreign minister on trade tour of China | China Daily Mail
  2. China concerned by US military buildup in Australia | Craig Hill
  3. China concerned by US military buildup in Australia | China Daily Mail

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: