Chinese ‘militia’ ships spark concern after ‘swarming’ disputed South China Sea

Chinese vessels are moored at Whitsun Reef, South China Sea

The Philippine military said Thursday it has discovered illegally built structures on features in the Union Banks, a series of reefs in the South China Sea near where Manila says Chinese maritime militia boats have been swarming in recent weeks.

The military said the structures were spotted during maritime patrols conducted on Tuesday, but it did not give the precise location of the structures or more details as to who erected them or as to their construction, saying only their presence violated international law.

“These structures are illegal,” military chief-of-staff Lt. Gen. Cirilito Sobejana said in a statement.

“The Laws of the Sea gives the Philippines indisputable and exclusive rights over the area. These constructions and other activities, economic or otherwise, are prejudicial to peace, good order, and security of our territorial waters,” Sobejana said.

“We have already updated our higher civilian authorities such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and Department of National Defense about these offenses to our sovereignty,” the general said.

“The Laws of the Sea gives the Philippines indisputable and exclusive rights over the area. These constructions and other activities, economic or otherwise, are prejudicial to peace, good order, and security of our territorial waters,” Sobejana said.

“We have already updated our higher civilian authorities such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and Department of National Defense about these offenses to our sovereignty,” the general said.

Manila has protested the presence of the boats with the Chinese government as a violation of its sovereignty and called for them to leave the area.

Beijing said the Chinese vessels are fishing boats and that they were simply escaping rough seas by moving within the lagoon formed by boomerang-shaped Whitsun Reef, which Beijing calls Niu’e Jiao and claims as part of its territory.

“Due to maritime situation, some fishing boats have been taking shelter from the wind near Niu’e Jiao, which is quite normal. We hope relevant sides can view this in a rational light,” Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said last week.

On Wednesday, the Philippine government released images and video of the Chinese vessels, which it says were made on March 27.

Philippine government images going back to March 7 show the Chinese boats in the lagoon.

Source: 7News – Chinese ‘militia’ ships spark concern after ‘swarming’ disputed South China Sea

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  1. Chinese ‘militia’ ships spark concern after ‘swarming’ disputed South China Sea - The Washington County Auditor

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